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How To Ease Back Into Life After Two Years of the COVID-19 Pandemic

With the omicron surge in our rearview mirror, there are some signs that the COVID-19 pandemic may finally be loosening its grip on the globe. But while case rates are lower here in the United States, they’re still elevated in other parts of the world, and certain members of the population might need a second…

When To Worry About Varicose Veins

For some people, the biggest concern about varicose veins is the way they look. But there are possible links between varicose veins and serious health problems involving blood clots in the deeper veins of your legs. Douglas Joseph, DO, Director of Cleveland Clinic’s Vascular Medicine Outpatient Department, offers his best advice on how to limit the…

How a Tick Bite Can Make You Allergic to Meat

Bad news, burger fans: A tick bite has the potential to permanently remove red meat from your menu. A meat allergy known as alpha-gal syndrome (AGS) appears to be triggered by a tick bite, researchers say. Case counts are growing, too. There were only 24 reported cases in the United State in 2009. By 2018,…

How To Find Spring Allergy Relief

Runny nose, itchy eyes, brain-rattling sneezes … must be spring! In many parts of the U.S., allergy season begins in February and can last until early summer. Allergist Frank J. Eidelman, MD, MBA, FAAAAI, explains what can make spring allergies so brutal and how you can manage the sneezing, wheezing, sniffling and more. Why your allergies are…

How To Pursue an Autism Diagnosis as an Adult

Thanks to growing awareness of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), diagnoses have been on the rise among children in recent years. At the turn of the millennium, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that 1 in 150 8-year-old children had an autism diagnosis. By 2018, the number was 1 in 44. But…

How To Cope With Stress From News and Events

In our modern world, there are many stressors and sources of anxiety. Global events, health-related issues and an overload of information from social media can add up quickly. And all of this can create overwhelming stress. “News has become more continual and more immediate,” says psychologist Matthew Sacco, PhD. “It’s harder now to step away…

Food Allergy vs. Intolerance: What’s the Difference?

If you have the same reaction to a certain food every time you eat it — like an upset stomach or diarrhea — you may think you have a food allergy. But it’s more likely you have a food intolerance, which affects an estimated 20% of the U.S. population. The key is understanding the differences…

How Accurate Is a Stool Test for Colon Cancer Screening?

Can a colon cancer screening really be as simple as mailing a sample of your stool (poop) to a lab for analysis? The answer might be yes — but don’t cancel that colonoscopy just yet. At-home stool tests can be an effective tool for detecting colon cancer. But they’re not as accurate as a colonoscopy…

Can Heart Disease Be Cured?

Atherosclerosis is a condition where the arteries in your heart become partially or fully blocked by a fatty material known as plaque. This can lead to coronary artery disease, which is also known as coronary heart disease or heart disease. Unfortunately, there isn’t a cure for coronary artery disease, and you can’t reverse this condition…

Does Dry Shampoo Actually Clean Your Hair?

You just got in a quick workout, so you give your hair a spritz of dry shampoo. You woke up late without time to shower, so you spray in some dry shampoo. You’re feeling a little greasy while you’re traveling, so — you guessed it — you turn to your trusted friend, dry shampoo. This…

Can Your Dentist Screen for Oral Cancer?

Your dentist likes to see you every six months. During these visits, they routinely check your mouth and teeth for cavities and gum problems. But your dentist is also your first line of defense against something more serious: oral cancer. Oral cancer includes cancers of the lips, tongue, cheek, floor of your mouth, hard and soft…

Can Hearing Loss Lead To Dementia?

If you’ve experienced hearing loss, you may be missing out on more than conversations around you. Several studies suggest hearing loss can increase your risk for cognitive (mental) issues, including dementia. Geriatric medicine specialist Ronan Factora, MD, helps us understand the connection that occurs between our auditory (hearing) system and the rest of our brain, while…

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